Dezentrale Stromerzeugung

The DECENT study was designed and carried out to identify the main barriers and success factors to the implementation of DG projects within the EU and to formulate a number of related recommendations to EU and Member State policy makers to enhance the feasibility of DG projects within the internal energy market.
© Springer
Decentralised Generation Technologies: Potentials, Success Factors and Impacts in the Liberalised EU Energy Market
2000 - 2002
Europäische Kommission, GD Transport und Energie

Overview

The DECENT study (Decentralised Generation Technologies - Potentials, Success Factors and Impacts in the Liberalised EU Energy Markets)
was designed and carried out to identify the main barriers and success factors to the implementation of DG projects within the EU and to formulate a number of related recommendations to EU and Member State policy makers to enhance the feasibility of DG projects within the internal energy market.

In the coming 20 years, decentralised generation (DG) is expected to play an increasingly important role in the European electricity infrastructure and market. DG can be defined as small-scale generation connected to the distribution network or on the customer side of the meter. The application of DG is often highly location specific and depends on such diverse issues as the possibilities of technical implementation, resource availability, environmental aspects, social embedding of the project, regulation and market conditions. These factors vary considerably among technologies and among the EU Member States.

The recent liberalisation of the European Energy Markets has completely changed the way the Energy sector is functioning. To allow for the integration of long-term oriented goals, e.g. environmental concerns, an appropriate framework for renewables and decentralised Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has to be installed. This is needed in order to meet the EU Kyoto-target for CO2-reduction and the 12 % goal for the share of renewable energy in 2010. A thorough understanding of the relation of the ongoing liberalisation in the Internal energy markets to decentralised generation will be of great importance for setting an appropriate framework for the markets to develop.

Within DECENT, decentralised generation comprises all generation installations that are connected to the distribution network or on the customer side of the meter. Within the project, this scope is further limited to technologies inherently contributing to CO2 reduction, i.e. use of renewable energy sources and technologies for combined heat and power (CHP) generation not exceeding a size of approx. 10 MWel.

More information

Wolfram Jörß et al.: Decentralised Power Generation in the Liberalised EU Energy Markets. Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2003, ISBN 3-540-40133-4

Wolfram Jörß et al.: DECENT Summary Report, 2002

Uyterlinde, M.A.; Sambeek, E.J.W. van; Cross, E.D.; Jörß, W.; Löffler, P.; Morthorst, P.E.; Holst Jørgensen, B. (2002) Distributed generation: Development of EU policy - Report in the framework of the DECENT project (Report ECN BS: ECN-C--02-075)

Jørgensen, B.H.; Joerss, W.; Morthorst, P.E. (2002): Wind energy in the EU liberalised electricity market: A comparative study of selected wind farms in Denmark, Germany and Spain. In: Proceedings CD-ROM. 2002 global windpower conference and exhibition, Paris (FR), 2-5 Apr 2002. (European Wind Energy Association, Brussels, 2002) 5 p.

Publikationen

  • 2003

  • Jörß, Wolfram; Joergensen, Birte Holst; Löffler, Peter; Morthorst, Paul E.; Uyterlinde, Martine; van Sambeek, Emiel; Wehnert, Timon (Hg.) (2003): Decentralised Power Generation in the Liberalised EU Energy Markets. Results from the DECENT research project. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.

    Decentralised Power Generation in the Liberalised EU Energy Markets

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